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Other Projects <subtitle type="text"></subtitle> <link rel="alternate" type="text/html" href="http://www.ifrtd.org"/> <id>http://www.ifrtd.org/index.php/projects/other-projects</id> <updated>2017-10-22T06:21:31+00:00</updated> <generator uri="http://joomla.org" version="2.5">Joomla! - Open Source Content Management</generator> <link rel="self" type="application/atom+xml" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/index.php/projects/other-projects?format=feed&type=atom"/> <entry> <title>Accessing Health Care on Three Wheels 2014-12-08T18:29:25+00:00 2014-12-08T18:29:25+00:00 http://www.ifrtd.org/index.php/projects/other-projects/105-accessing-health-care-on-three-wheels Super User ngugimode@yahoo.com <div class="feed-description"><p></p> <p>Taking forward the issues raised by IFRTD's Mobility and Health programme, a project has been launched to address the problems rural women face accessing health care services in Rajasthan, India. &nbsp;&nbsp;The Rickshaw Project, initiated by the Birla Institute of Technology and Science (BITS), Pilani and SOHARD, a Neemrana based NGO, aims to provide an easily accessible and affordable round-the-clock transport facility for medical help at the village level. &nbsp;The project has been supported via IFRTD with funds raised by the Women in Transport Seminar London (WTS). &nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">With an investment of Rs 161300 (USD 3,450) the project has purchased an APE DAC model auto rickshaw. A monitoring team has been established which has appointed a driver for the vehicle, and a cluster of five beneficiary villages with a total population of 15000 have been identified: Dabarbas, Dhani Dabarbas, Anandpur, Dhikvad, and Khund Road. The auto rickshaw and the driver are located at the SOHARD headquarter in a centrally located village. The contact number of the driver is written on the auto rickshaw and has been made known to the villagers through the elective representatives of these villages. Any person from these villages can contact the driver to take a patient to the nearest health care center at a minimum charge established in consultation with the village representatives. Anyone living below the poverty line is provided with the service free of charge. A representative from SOHARD monitors the daily functioning of the project which is quarterly reviewed by the monitoring team.</p> <p>More than 30 elected representatives of the village Panchayats (sarpanches and panches), mostly women, attended the launching ceremony of the project on the 4th July 2010 in Anandpur village. Shree Niranjan Sharma, Director, SOHARD threw light on the objectives and importance of the project and thanked BITS, Pilani, WTS and IFRTD for the initiative and for giving SOHARD the opportunity to collaborate on the project. Dr. Sanjiv kumar Choudhary, the Coordinator of the project talked about the importance of this new transport facility for the villages. He noted the medical benefits and urged the gathered audience to use the rickshaw to ensure that no more deaths occurred through avoidable delays to health care services. &nbsp;He also remarked that the success of this project could ensure the extension of such a facility to more villages. Prof. A. K. Sarkar, the guiding force behind the project, spoke about the background of this project and hoped that this facility would be of immense help to the villagers, particularly women who suffer more because of the lack of proper transport facility at the time of medical needs.&nbsp;</p> <h4 style="text-align: justify;"><br /> For more information about this project please contact:</h4> <p style="text-align: justify;">Dr Sanjiv Kumar Choudhary <br /> Project Coordinator<br /> <em>Email</em>: &nbsp;<a href="mailto:&lt;a href=" mailto:sanjivkr64="" gmail="" com="">sanjivkr64@gmail.com</a></p> <h4 style="text-align: justify;">Useful Links:<strong> <br /> </strong></h4> <p></p> <ul> <li>Images from the project: &nbsp;<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/ifrtd/sets/72157624359543657/%20">www.flickr.com/photos/ifrtd/sets/72157624359543657/ </a></li> <li>Women's Transportation Seminar London <a target="_blank" href="http://www.wtslondon.org/">www.wtslondon.org</a></li> <li>BITS Pilani - <a target="_blank" href="http://www.bits-pilani.ac.in/">www.bits-pilani.ac.in/</a></li> </ul> <p></p></div> <div class="feed-description"><p></p> <p>Taking forward the issues raised by IFRTD's Mobility and Health programme, a project has been launched to address the problems rural women face accessing health care services in Rajasthan, India. &nbsp;&nbsp;The Rickshaw Project, initiated by the Birla Institute of Technology and Science (BITS), Pilani and SOHARD, a Neemrana based NGO, aims to provide an easily accessible and affordable round-the-clock transport facility for medical help at the village level. &nbsp;The project has been supported via IFRTD with funds raised by the Women in Transport Seminar London (WTS). &nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">With an investment of Rs 161300 (USD 3,450) the project has purchased an APE DAC model auto rickshaw. A monitoring team has been established which has appointed a driver for the vehicle, and a cluster of five beneficiary villages with a total population of 15000 have been identified: Dabarbas, Dhani Dabarbas, Anandpur, Dhikvad, and Khund Road. The auto rickshaw and the driver are located at the SOHARD headquarter in a centrally located village. The contact number of the driver is written on the auto rickshaw and has been made known to the villagers through the elective representatives of these villages. Any person from these villages can contact the driver to take a patient to the nearest health care center at a minimum charge established in consultation with the village representatives. Anyone living below the poverty line is provided with the service free of charge. A representative from SOHARD monitors the daily functioning of the project which is quarterly reviewed by the monitoring team.</p> <p>More than 30 elected representatives of the village Panchayats (sarpanches and panches), mostly women, attended the launching ceremony of the project on the 4th July 2010 in Anandpur village. Shree Niranjan Sharma, Director, SOHARD threw light on the objectives and importance of the project and thanked BITS, Pilani, WTS and IFRTD for the initiative and for giving SOHARD the opportunity to collaborate on the project. Dr. Sanjiv kumar Choudhary, the Coordinator of the project talked about the importance of this new transport facility for the villages. He noted the medical benefits and urged the gathered audience to use the rickshaw to ensure that no more deaths occurred through avoidable delays to health care services. &nbsp;He also remarked that the success of this project could ensure the extension of such a facility to more villages. Prof. A. K. Sarkar, the guiding force behind the project, spoke about the background of this project and hoped that this facility would be of immense help to the villagers, particularly women who suffer more because of the lack of proper transport facility at the time of medical needs.&nbsp;</p> <h4 style="text-align: justify;"><br /> For more information about this project please contact:</h4> <p style="text-align: justify;">Dr Sanjiv Kumar Choudhary <br /> Project Coordinator<br /> <em>Email</em>: &nbsp;<a href="mailto:&lt;a href=" mailto:sanjivkr64="" gmail="" com="">sanjivkr64@gmail.com</a></p> <h4 style="text-align: justify;">Useful Links:<strong> <br /> </strong></h4> <p></p> <ul> <li>Images from the project: &nbsp;<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/ifrtd/sets/72157624359543657/%20">www.flickr.com/photos/ifrtd/sets/72157624359543657/ </a></li> <li>Women's Transportation Seminar London <a target="_blank" href="http://www.wtslondon.org/">www.wtslondon.org</a></li> <li>BITS Pilani - <a target="_blank" href="http://www.bits-pilani.ac.in/">www.bits-pilani.ac.in/</a></li> </ul> <p></p></div> Balancing the Load 2014-12-09T13:55:23+00:00 2014-12-09T13:55:23+00:00 http://www.ifrtd.org/index.php/projects/other-projects/113-balancing-the-load Super User ngugimode@yahoo.com <div class="feed-description"><p><img alt="Balancing-the-Load" src="images/ifrtd/projects/Balancing-the-Load.jpg" height="400" width="745" /></p> <p>Balancing the Load was initiated in 1996 with the aim of filling in the gaps in our knowledge about how gender relations affect women and men's access to goods and services and influence the provision of transport infrastructure and services.</p> <p>At the time the immense volume of analytical work emanating from the gender and development programmes of universities and development agencies world-wide did not seem to have permeated the consciousness of transport providers, planners and policy makers including those working on rural transport issues. Similarly although gender analysis was rapidly becoming integrated into rural development work, planners and practitioners still rarely addressed the issues of access and mobility. The Balancing the Load programme was conceived with the aim of bringing these two groups together.</p> <div>IFRTD chose to implement the programme using a networked research approach&nbsp;to maximise the participation of men and women working with rural communities, establish dialogue between those working on gender issues and those working on rural transport, and create opportunities for networking amongst them. The focus was on raising the profile of the issues rather than exploring them exhaustively. The programme carried out 40 case studies in Asia and Africa and shared the findings with a wider audience through regional and international seminars and through the publication of the full case studies in a book;&nbsp;<em>Balancing the Load; Women, gender and Transport (2002).</em></div> <div></div> <p>Download the proceedings of the regional seminars in Asia and Africa that were the culmination of the research programme:</p></div> <div class="feed-description"><p><img alt="Balancing-the-Load" src="images/ifrtd/projects/Balancing-the-Load.jpg" height="400" width="745" /></p> <p>Balancing the Load was initiated in 1996 with the aim of filling in the gaps in our knowledge about how gender relations affect women and men's access to goods and services and influence the provision of transport infrastructure and services.</p> <p>At the time the immense volume of analytical work emanating from the gender and development programmes of universities and development agencies world-wide did not seem to have permeated the consciousness of transport providers, planners and policy makers including those working on rural transport issues. Similarly although gender analysis was rapidly becoming integrated into rural development work, planners and practitioners still rarely addressed the issues of access and mobility. The Balancing the Load programme was conceived with the aim of bringing these two groups together.</p> <div>IFRTD chose to implement the programme using a networked research approach&nbsp;to maximise the participation of men and women working with rural communities, establish dialogue between those working on gender issues and those working on rural transport, and create opportunities for networking amongst them. The focus was on raising the profile of the issues rather than exploring them exhaustively. The programme carried out 40 case studies in Asia and Africa and shared the findings with a wider audience through regional and international seminars and through the publication of the full case studies in a book;&nbsp;<em>Balancing the Load; Women, gender and Transport (2002).</em></div> <div></div> <p>Download the proceedings of the regional seminars in Asia and Africa that were the culmination of the research programme:</p></div> Developing indicators to assess rural transport services 2013-11-18T16:26:57+00:00 2013-11-18T16:26:57+00:00 http://www.ifrtd.org/index.php/projects/other-projects/22-developing-indicators-to-assess-rural-transport-services Super User ngugimode@yahoo.com <div class="feed-description"><p><img style="margin-right: 8px; float: left;" alt="indicators-to-assess" src="images/ifrtd/projects/indicators-to-assess.jpg" height="175" width="234" />The IFRTD in conjunction with Paul Starkey has been awarded a research contract by the African Community Access Programme (AFCAP) to develop and test indicators that can be used to assess how good rural transport services are at providing access for rural people.</p> <h2></h2> <h2>Developing indicators to assess rural transport services</h2> <p></p> <div style="clear: both;"></div> <p>[accordion] <br />&nbsp;[accordion_item title='New research study']</p> <p>The IFRTD in conjunction with Paul Starkey has been awarded a research contract by the African Community Access Programme (AFCAP) to develop and test indicators that can be used to assess how good rural transport services are at providing access for rural people. The envisaged outcome of the research will be appropriate rural transport services indicators that are tested and disseminated to the transport sector in various African countries. The research aims to identify, develop, test and share rural transport services indicators relevant to the key stakeholders, including rural people, transport operators, regulators, planners, roads authorities and development agencies. This will be achieved using participative methodologies involving local stakeholders and sector experts. Initial studies will be carried out in Kenya and Tanzania between April and September 2012. If the initial findings are encouraging, work will be extended to further African countries.</p> <p>[/accordion_item]<br />&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; [accordion_item title='The context']</p> <p>Rural roads are vital for poverty reduction and economic development. However, in Africa, where most people do not own motorised means of transport, roads alone cannot meet the rural access needs of communities. People require transport services and/or means of transport for their livelihoods and to access markets, health services, education and numerous economic, social and civic opportunities. People living in rural areas need transport between their homes and the various facilities and opportunities available in their local trading posts, market towns and district (or provincial) administrative centres. The road transport services that provide such access are crucial for poverty reduction, economic development and meeting the Millennium Development Goals. In a few countries, buses provide such services. More commonly smaller public transport vehicles cater for such demand, including midi-buses, minibuses, pickups, light trucks and/or cars. These are sometimes known as ‘rural taxis’. These may be complemented by motorcycle taxis, bicycle taxis and animal powered transport.</p> <p>[/accordion_item] <br />&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; [accordion_item title='The need for indicators']Transport ministries, roads authorities, donor agencies and the road construction industry all assume that publically-funded road construction and maintenance will enable private sector operators to run appropriate rural transport services. Road investments are justified by anticipated reductions in vehicle operating costs that will (it is assumed) lead to improved transport services. The crucial assumption that private operators will provide appropriate rural transport services in response to road investment is seldom verified, partly due to lack of agreed indicators of rural transport services. Indeed there are many examples in Africa of motorable roads that lack regular and predictable rural transport services. Rural women, men, children and those with special needs will have opinions as to whether the transport services that link them to markets, employment, healthcare and services are sufficiently frequent, affordable, comfortable, safe and reliable. Those planning and implementing development investments require ways of measuring these parameters so they can compare access provision over time and distance, in order to monitor changes and prioritise interventions.</p> <p>[/accordion_item]<br /> [accordion_item title='Rural Access Indicator']The World Bank’s Rural Access Indicator (RAI) equates rural access to proximity (2 km) to a motorable road, ignoring transport services. This long-term development indicator is relatively ‘unresponsive’ to anything except motorable roads. The Rural Access Indicator is the same if the road two kilometres away is paved and has frequent, cheap transport services or is an eroded (but passable) track with one public transport truck a week charging high fares. Upgrading a rough track to a paved road does not affect this indicator despite people’s greater access to markets, services and economic opportunities. There is need for another indicator that will complement the RAI and provide some means of assessing how rural transport services are meeting the access needs of rural populations. Approach to Rural Transport Services indicators The research team wish to identify and test indicators that can ‘measure’ rural transport services in ways meaningful to the key stakeholders. If practicable, the Rural Transport Indicators should be consistent and replicable and allow appropriate comparisons over time and space. They should be based on data that is easy to collect and should measure parameters that are relevant to the main stakeholders (passengers, operators, regulators). Key indicator components are likely to include actual passenger fares, frequency and journey time. If practicable, they should also reflect safety, security, reliability, predictability, accessibility and comfort, taking into account issues concerning gender, age, disability and socio-economic disadvantage. Other issues may include transport capacity, freight transport and alternative modes of transport.</p> <p>[/accordion_item]<br />&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; [accordion_item title='Methodology']The team will develop a methodology for assessing rural transport services using participatory surveys undertaken in cooperation with a range of stakeholders in Kenya and Tanzania. Provisional indicators will be tested for reliability and relevance to the different stakeholders. Indicator applications for planning, monitoring and evaluation will be assessed with comparisons over time and space with collaborating partners. The research is planned to expand to further countries, as indicators are tested and validated with partner organisations.</p> <p>[/accordion_item] <br />&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; [accordion_item title='Professional collaboration encouraged']The research team will be led by Paul Starkey (Team Leader) and Peter Njenga (Project Manager). Paul has many years of experience as an international consultant in rural transport. Peter is a transport planner and the Executive director of IFRTD. Team members include Dr Kenneth Odero, Dr Musyimi Mbathi and Guy Kemtsop. All team members favour a collaborative, networking approach. An international Project Consultative Group will help to advise and guide the work. A website is being developed to share progress from the outset and gain feedback and ideas through comments and discussions. People who have ideas or experience related to transport services and indicators, or who know of relevant documents, are encouraged to contact the Team Leader. Organisations in Africa working on rural transport are encouraged to collaborate with the team in the development and testing of the methodology and the use and validation of the preliminary indicators.</p> <p>[/accordion_item]<br />[/accordion]</p> <p> <table border="0" cellpadding="8"> <tbody> <tr> <td valign="top">Paul Starkey <br /> Team Leader, Rural Transport Services Indicators <br /> 64 Northcourt Avenue Reading RG2 7HQ, UK <br /> Tel: +44 118 987 2152 Skype: paulstarkey <br /> Email: <a href="mailto:&lt;a href=" mailto:p="" h="" starkey="" reading="" ac="" uk="">p.h.starkey@reading.ac.uk</a> and <a href="mailto:&lt;a href=" mailto:paul="" paulstarkey="" net="">paul@paulstarkey.net</a> </td> <td valign="top">Peter Njenga <br /> Executive Director, IFRTD <br /> PO Box 314, 00502 Karen Nairobi, Kenya <br /> Tel: +254 722360860, +254 707899916 <br /> Email: <a href="mailto:&lt;a href=" mailto:peter="" njenga="" ifrtd="" org="">peter.njenga@ifrtd.org</a> and <a valign="top" href="mailto:peter.njenga@ifrtd.org" mailto:peter="" njenga="" wananchi="" com="">peter.njenga@wananchi.com</a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </p></div> <div class="feed-description"><p><img style="margin-right: 8px; float: left;" alt="indicators-to-assess" src="images/ifrtd/projects/indicators-to-assess.jpg" height="175" width="234" />The IFRTD in conjunction with Paul Starkey has been awarded a research contract by the African Community Access Programme (AFCAP) to develop and test indicators that can be used to assess how good rural transport services are at providing access for rural people.</p> <h2></h2> <h2>Developing indicators to assess rural transport services</h2> <p></p> <div style="clear: both;"></div> <p>[accordion] <br />&nbsp;[accordion_item title='New research study']</p> <p>The IFRTD in conjunction with Paul Starkey has been awarded a research contract by the African Community Access Programme (AFCAP) to develop and test indicators that can be used to assess how good rural transport services are at providing access for rural people. The envisaged outcome of the research will be appropriate rural transport services indicators that are tested and disseminated to the transport sector in various African countries. The research aims to identify, develop, test and share rural transport services indicators relevant to the key stakeholders, including rural people, transport operators, regulators, planners, roads authorities and development agencies. This will be achieved using participative methodologies involving local stakeholders and sector experts. Initial studies will be carried out in Kenya and Tanzania between April and September 2012. If the initial findings are encouraging, work will be extended to further African countries.</p> <p>[/accordion_item]<br />&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; [accordion_item title='The context']</p> <p>Rural roads are vital for poverty reduction and economic development. However, in Africa, where most people do not own motorised means of transport, roads alone cannot meet the rural access needs of communities. People require transport services and/or means of transport for their livelihoods and to access markets, health services, education and numerous economic, social and civic opportunities. People living in rural areas need transport between their homes and the various facilities and opportunities available in their local trading posts, market towns and district (or provincial) administrative centres. The road transport services that provide such access are crucial for poverty reduction, economic development and meeting the Millennium Development Goals. In a few countries, buses provide such services. More commonly smaller public transport vehicles cater for such demand, including midi-buses, minibuses, pickups, light trucks and/or cars. These are sometimes known as ‘rural taxis’. These may be complemented by motorcycle taxis, bicycle taxis and animal powered transport.</p> <p>[/accordion_item] <br />&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; [accordion_item title='The need for indicators']Transport ministries, roads authorities, donor agencies and the road construction industry all assume that publically-funded road construction and maintenance will enable private sector operators to run appropriate rural transport services. Road investments are justified by anticipated reductions in vehicle operating costs that will (it is assumed) lead to improved transport services. The crucial assumption that private operators will provide appropriate rural transport services in response to road investment is seldom verified, partly due to lack of agreed indicators of rural transport services. Indeed there are many examples in Africa of motorable roads that lack regular and predictable rural transport services. Rural women, men, children and those with special needs will have opinions as to whether the transport services that link them to markets, employment, healthcare and services are sufficiently frequent, affordable, comfortable, safe and reliable. Those planning and implementing development investments require ways of measuring these parameters so they can compare access provision over time and distance, in order to monitor changes and prioritise interventions.</p> <p>[/accordion_item]<br /> [accordion_item title='Rural Access Indicator']The World Bank’s Rural Access Indicator (RAI) equates rural access to proximity (2 km) to a motorable road, ignoring transport services. This long-term development indicator is relatively ‘unresponsive’ to anything except motorable roads. The Rural Access Indicator is the same if the road two kilometres away is paved and has frequent, cheap transport services or is an eroded (but passable) track with one public transport truck a week charging high fares. Upgrading a rough track to a paved road does not affect this indicator despite people’s greater access to markets, services and economic opportunities. There is need for another indicator that will complement the RAI and provide some means of assessing how rural transport services are meeting the access needs of rural populations. Approach to Rural Transport Services indicators The research team wish to identify and test indicators that can ‘measure’ rural transport services in ways meaningful to the key stakeholders. If practicable, the Rural Transport Indicators should be consistent and replicable and allow appropriate comparisons over time and space. They should be based on data that is easy to collect and should measure parameters that are relevant to the main stakeholders (passengers, operators, regulators). Key indicator components are likely to include actual passenger fares, frequency and journey time. If practicable, they should also reflect safety, security, reliability, predictability, accessibility and comfort, taking into account issues concerning gender, age, disability and socio-economic disadvantage. Other issues may include transport capacity, freight transport and alternative modes of transport.</p> <p>[/accordion_item]<br />&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; [accordion_item title='Methodology']The team will develop a methodology for assessing rural transport services using participatory surveys undertaken in cooperation with a range of stakeholders in Kenya and Tanzania. Provisional indicators will be tested for reliability and relevance to the different stakeholders. Indicator applications for planning, monitoring and evaluation will be assessed with comparisons over time and space with collaborating partners. The research is planned to expand to further countries, as indicators are tested and validated with partner organisations.</p> <p>[/accordion_item] <br />&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; [accordion_item title='Professional collaboration encouraged']The research team will be led by Paul Starkey (Team Leader) and Peter Njenga (Project Manager). Paul has many years of experience as an international consultant in rural transport. Peter is a transport planner and the Executive director of IFRTD. Team members include Dr Kenneth Odero, Dr Musyimi Mbathi and Guy Kemtsop. All team members favour a collaborative, networking approach. An international Project Consultative Group will help to advise and guide the work. A website is being developed to share progress from the outset and gain feedback and ideas through comments and discussions. People who have ideas or experience related to transport services and indicators, or who know of relevant documents, are encouraged to contact the Team Leader. Organisations in Africa working on rural transport are encouraged to collaborate with the team in the development and testing of the methodology and the use and validation of the preliminary indicators.</p> <p>[/accordion_item]<br />[/accordion]</p> <p> <table border="0" cellpadding="8"> <tbody> <tr> <td valign="top">Paul Starkey <br /> Team Leader, Rural Transport Services Indicators <br /> 64 Northcourt Avenue Reading RG2 7HQ, UK <br /> Tel: +44 118 987 2152 Skype: paulstarkey <br /> Email: <a href="mailto:&lt;a href=" mailto:p="" h="" starkey="" reading="" ac="" uk="">p.h.starkey@reading.ac.uk</a> and <a href="mailto:&lt;a href=" mailto:paul="" paulstarkey="" net="">paul@paulstarkey.net</a> </td> <td valign="top">Peter Njenga <br /> Executive Director, IFRTD <br /> PO Box 314, 00502 Karen Nairobi, Kenya <br /> Tel: +254 722360860, +254 707899916 <br /> Email: <a href="mailto:&lt;a href=" mailto:peter="" njenga="" ifrtd="" org="">peter.njenga@ifrtd.org</a> and <a valign="top" href="mailto:peter.njenga@ifrtd.org" mailto:peter="" njenga="" wananchi="" com="">peter.njenga@wananchi.com</a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </p></div> Improving Mobility Workshop Series 2014-12-09T13:55:23+00:00 2014-12-09T13:55:23+00:00 http://www.ifrtd.org/index.php/projects/other-projects/112-improving-mobility-workshop-series Super User ngugimode@yahoo.com <div class="feed-description"><p><img alt="Improving-Mobility-Workshop-Series" src="images/ifrtd/projects/Improving-Mobility-Workshop-Series.jpg" height="400" width="745" /></p> <p>Eliminating poverty requires the reduction of isolation and social exclusion. It means improving mobility and access so that poor women, men and children can build their assets, reduce their vulnerability and develop sustainable livelihoods. Many of the world's poor live in rural areas of Africa, Asia and Latin America where there is a low density of demand for transport, rural infrastructure is poor, cash flows are seasonal, and means of mobility are generally arduous and time-consuming. If poverty is to be eradicated in these areas the vicious cycle of poverty and transport deprivation must be broken, and replaced with a virtuous cycle of greater mobility, stimulating more productive activities and diverse, sustainable transport services.</p> <p>IFRTD's&nbsp;<strong>Improving Mobility Workshops</strong>&nbsp;were a series of 4 linked events held in Asia, Africa and Latin America to discuss how this can be done. The programme, co-funded by the World Bank, RTTP and DFID buillt upon consultations that fed into the publication:</p> <h4>'Improving Rural Mobility: Options for Developing Motorised and Non Motorised Transport in Rural Areas'</h4> <ul> <li>prepared for the World Bank by P Starkey, S Ellis, J Hine, and A Ternell (2002).</li> <li><strong>Download:</strong> <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/WBImprovingRuralMobilityPaper.pdf">Acrobat pdf 631 kb</a></li> </ul> <div>The workshops aimed to widen debate and deepen analysis on inadequate transport services for poor people, to share knowledge and practical experience, to develop strategies to increase rural mobility and influence policy, and to propose realistic and collaborative actions. They adopted a participatory methodology and progressed through four consecutive stages of:</div> <ul> <li>Situation review and problem analysis.</li> <li class="_mce_tagged_br">Prioritisation of options for intervention.</li> <li class="_mce_tagged_br">Field visit to consider local practicalities and priorities.</li> <li>Output oriented group work to develop realistic proposals for individual and joint action that will make an&nbsp;impact.</li> </ul> <p>The workshops were held in India, Tanzania, Guinea, and Nicaragua. The proceedings from each workshop are available in hard copy from the IFRTD Secretariat. Please emailmobility@ifrtd.org to obtain a copy. They can also be downloaded here:</p> <ul> <li>Download Proceedings of the Asia Workshop - <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/IMproceedingsAsia.doc">Word doc 3.83MB</a></li> <li>Download Proceedings of the East and Southern Africa Workshop</li> <li>Download Proceedings of the West and Central Africa Workshop (French)</li> <li>Download Proceedings of the Latin America Workshop (Spanish) - <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/IM_Proceedings_LA.pdf">Acrobat pdf 610 kb</a></li> </ul></div> <div class="feed-description"><p><img alt="Improving-Mobility-Workshop-Series" src="images/ifrtd/projects/Improving-Mobility-Workshop-Series.jpg" height="400" width="745" /></p> <p>Eliminating poverty requires the reduction of isolation and social exclusion. It means improving mobility and access so that poor women, men and children can build their assets, reduce their vulnerability and develop sustainable livelihoods. Many of the world's poor live in rural areas of Africa, Asia and Latin America where there is a low density of demand for transport, rural infrastructure is poor, cash flows are seasonal, and means of mobility are generally arduous and time-consuming. If poverty is to be eradicated in these areas the vicious cycle of poverty and transport deprivation must be broken, and replaced with a virtuous cycle of greater mobility, stimulating more productive activities and diverse, sustainable transport services.</p> <p>IFRTD's&nbsp;<strong>Improving Mobility Workshops</strong>&nbsp;were a series of 4 linked events held in Asia, Africa and Latin America to discuss how this can be done. The programme, co-funded by the World Bank, RTTP and DFID buillt upon consultations that fed into the publication:</p> <h4>'Improving Rural Mobility: Options for Developing Motorised and Non Motorised Transport in Rural Areas'</h4> <ul> <li>prepared for the World Bank by P Starkey, S Ellis, J Hine, and A Ternell (2002).</li> <li><strong>Download:</strong> <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/WBImprovingRuralMobilityPaper.pdf">Acrobat pdf 631 kb</a></li> </ul> <div>The workshops aimed to widen debate and deepen analysis on inadequate transport services for poor people, to share knowledge and practical experience, to develop strategies to increase rural mobility and influence policy, and to propose realistic and collaborative actions. They adopted a participatory methodology and progressed through four consecutive stages of:</div> <ul> <li>Situation review and problem analysis.</li> <li class="_mce_tagged_br">Prioritisation of options for intervention.</li> <li class="_mce_tagged_br">Field visit to consider local practicalities and priorities.</li> <li>Output oriented group work to develop realistic proposals for individual and joint action that will make an&nbsp;impact.</li> </ul> <p>The workshops were held in India, Tanzania, Guinea, and Nicaragua. The proceedings from each workshop are available in hard copy from the IFRTD Secretariat. Please emailmobility@ifrtd.org to obtain a copy. They can also be downloaded here:</p> <ul> <li>Download Proceedings of the Asia Workshop - <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/IMproceedingsAsia.doc">Word doc 3.83MB</a></li> <li>Download Proceedings of the East and Southern Africa Workshop</li> <li>Download Proceedings of the West and Central Africa Workshop (French)</li> <li>Download Proceedings of the Latin America Workshop (Spanish) - <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/IM_Proceedings_LA.pdf">Acrobat pdf 610 kb</a></li> </ul></div> Poverty Watch: Making Transport Count in Poverty Reduction 2014-12-08T19:58:56+00:00 2014-12-08T19:58:56+00:00 http://www.ifrtd.org/index.php/projects/other-projects/109-poverty-watch-making-transport-count-in-poverty-reduction Super User ngugimode@yahoo.com <div class="feed-description"><p><img alt="poverty-watch" src="images/ifrtd/projects/poverty-watch.jpg" height="400" width="745" /></p> <p>Poverty Watch is an IFRTD initiated programme that enables civil society to monitor transport investments and to encourage pro-poor transport policies.To date Poverty Watch has built the capacity of stakeholders in developing countries to carry out analytical work on the links between transport and poverty and to implement this knowledge through policy advocacy or practical interventions.</p> <h2>Poverty Watch Key Principles:</h2> <ul> <li><strong>The transport sector is so strategic to economic and social development that it requires increased public accountability and regular auditing of its impact on poverty reduction.</strong></li> <li><strong>Prevailing economic and engineering models that guide decision making processes within the transport sector do not enable transport to deliver against broader development goals.</strong></li> <li><strong>Although transport has no direct impact on poverty it does play an important role supporting economic growth, and specifically helps poor people to develop their physical assets and to accumulate human, social, and political capital. </strong></li> <li><strong>It is rarely considered neccessary to subject transport sector policies and investment decisions to pro-poor analysis. This leads to economic and social differentiation and ultimately inequality and poverty.</strong></li> </ul> <p>Through the Poverty Watch programme IFRTD affiliated networks in countries across Asia, Africa, and Latin America have reviewed:</p> <ul> <li>The pro-poor agenda of national transport sector policies and ongoing transport investment programmes.</li> <li>The inclusion of mobility and access issues within key national development policies, for example - PRSPS or National Development Plans.</li> </ul> <p>This process enabled IFRTD affiliated networks to build a critical mass of interested stakeholders. The first step in the development of an informed civil society platform that is capable of debating the issues and identifying key priorities for a transport and poverty agenda in each country.<span style="color: #990000;"></span></p> <h4><span style="color: #000000;">14 countries participated in the first phase of the Poverty Watch programme: </span></h4> <ul> <li style="color: #990000;"><span style="color: #990000;"> <strong>Africa -</strong></span> Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda, Zimbabwe, Burkina Faso, DR Congo, Senegal<span style="color: #990000;"><strong></strong></span></li> <li style="color: #990000;"><span style="color: #990000;"><strong>Asia -</strong></span> Sri Lanka, Cambodia, Indonesia, Nepal<span style="color: #990000;"><strong></strong></span></li> <li style="color: #990000;"><span style="color: #990000;"><strong>Latin America -</strong> Nicaragua, Bolivia, and Perú.</span></li> </ul> <p>In these countries programme participants carried out studies to explore where and how existing national transport policies and strategies have interfaced with national poverty reduction efforts. These country reviews alongside regional synthesis papers highlighting the key issues emerging from the review are available to download below.</p> <p>The first phase of the Poverty Watch programme culminated in an international workshop in Nairobi Kenya, December 2005, to develop a Transport and Poverty Monitoring Framework. The workshop brought together a number of researchers from Africa, Asia and Latin America who had participated in the programme. The workshop report is available for download below</p> <h4><strong>Resources: </strong></h4> <ul> <li>Regional Synthesis for Latin America by Julio C Sanchez Uzeda and Ana Bravo&nbsp; <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_regla.doc">(Word doc 316kb)</a></li> <li>Regional Synthesis for East and Southern Africa by Kenneth Odero and Peter Njenga&nbsp; <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_regesa.doc">(Word doc 236kb) </a></li> <li>Regional Synthesis for West and Central Africa by Bamba Thioye&nbsp; <a href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_regwca.doc">(Word Doc 46kb)</a></li> </ul> <h4>Country Reviews:</h4> <ul> <li>Burkina Faso <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_burkina.doc">(word 54kb)</a></li> <li>Cambodia&nbsp;<a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_cambodia.doc">(word 219kb)</a></li> <li>DR Congo <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_congo.doc">(word 37kb)</a></li> <li>Indonesia <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_indonesia.pdf">(pdf 1529 kb)</a></li> <li>Kenya <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_kenya.pdf">(pdf 332kb)</a></li> <li>Nicaragua <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_nicaragua.doc">(word 6.1MB)</a><strong><em> </em></strong>Senegal <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_senegal.doc">(Word 51kb)</a></li> <li>Sri Lanka <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_lanka.doc">(Word 57kb)</a></li> <li>Tanzania <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_tanzania.pdf">(pdf 324kb) </a><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_tanzania.doc">(Word 500kb)</a></li> <li>Uganda&nbsp;<a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_uganda.pdf">(pdf 386kb)</a><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_uganda.doc">(Word 271 kb)</a></li> <li>Zimbabwe <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_zimbabwe.pdf">(pdf 537kb)</a><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_zimbabwe.doc">(word 996 kb)</a></li> <li>Poverty Watch Phase 1 international workshop report: <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_phase1workshopreport.doc">(Word doc 160kb) </a></li> </ul> <h4><strong><em> </em></strong>Poverty Watch publications:<em></em><strong><em></em></strong></h4> <p></p> <ol> <li><strong>IFRTD Forum News, Volume 12 issue 4, Feb 2006</strong> An in depth synthesis of the first phase of Poverty Watch including a presentation of the first draft of the <em>Transport and Poverty Monitoring Framework</em><em>.<span style="color: #990000;">&nbsp;</span></em></li> <li>Promoting Pro-poor transport policies and action in Sri lanka. By the Lanka Forum on Rural Transport Development (2005) Colombo, Sri Lanka.<em>&nbsp;<span style="color: #990000;"></span></em></li> <li><em></em>Transpolicy. Pro-poor Transport Policy. Meeting the challenges in Zimbabwe. By Kenneth Odero, ZFRTD (feb 2005).<em><span style="color: #990000;"></span></em></li> </ol> <p></p></div> <div class="feed-description"><p><img alt="poverty-watch" src="images/ifrtd/projects/poverty-watch.jpg" height="400" width="745" /></p> <p>Poverty Watch is an IFRTD initiated programme that enables civil society to monitor transport investments and to encourage pro-poor transport policies.To date Poverty Watch has built the capacity of stakeholders in developing countries to carry out analytical work on the links between transport and poverty and to implement this knowledge through policy advocacy or practical interventions.</p> <h2>Poverty Watch Key Principles:</h2> <ul> <li><strong>The transport sector is so strategic to economic and social development that it requires increased public accountability and regular auditing of its impact on poverty reduction.</strong></li> <li><strong>Prevailing economic and engineering models that guide decision making processes within the transport sector do not enable transport to deliver against broader development goals.</strong></li> <li><strong>Although transport has no direct impact on poverty it does play an important role supporting economic growth, and specifically helps poor people to develop their physical assets and to accumulate human, social, and political capital. </strong></li> <li><strong>It is rarely considered neccessary to subject transport sector policies and investment decisions to pro-poor analysis. This leads to economic and social differentiation and ultimately inequality and poverty.</strong></li> </ul> <p>Through the Poverty Watch programme IFRTD affiliated networks in countries across Asia, Africa, and Latin America have reviewed:</p> <ul> <li>The pro-poor agenda of national transport sector policies and ongoing transport investment programmes.</li> <li>The inclusion of mobility and access issues within key national development policies, for example - PRSPS or National Development Plans.</li> </ul> <p>This process enabled IFRTD affiliated networks to build a critical mass of interested stakeholders. The first step in the development of an informed civil society platform that is capable of debating the issues and identifying key priorities for a transport and poverty agenda in each country.<span style="color: #990000;"></span></p> <h4><span style="color: #000000;">14 countries participated in the first phase of the Poverty Watch programme: </span></h4> <ul> <li style="color: #990000;"><span style="color: #990000;"> <strong>Africa -</strong></span> Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda, Zimbabwe, Burkina Faso, DR Congo, Senegal<span style="color: #990000;"><strong></strong></span></li> <li style="color: #990000;"><span style="color: #990000;"><strong>Asia -</strong></span> Sri Lanka, Cambodia, Indonesia, Nepal<span style="color: #990000;"><strong></strong></span></li> <li style="color: #990000;"><span style="color: #990000;"><strong>Latin America -</strong> Nicaragua, Bolivia, and Perú.</span></li> </ul> <p>In these countries programme participants carried out studies to explore where and how existing national transport policies and strategies have interfaced with national poverty reduction efforts. These country reviews alongside regional synthesis papers highlighting the key issues emerging from the review are available to download below.</p> <p>The first phase of the Poverty Watch programme culminated in an international workshop in Nairobi Kenya, December 2005, to develop a Transport and Poverty Monitoring Framework. The workshop brought together a number of researchers from Africa, Asia and Latin America who had participated in the programme. The workshop report is available for download below</p> <h4><strong>Resources: </strong></h4> <ul> <li>Regional Synthesis for Latin America by Julio C Sanchez Uzeda and Ana Bravo&nbsp; <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_regla.doc">(Word doc 316kb)</a></li> <li>Regional Synthesis for East and Southern Africa by Kenneth Odero and Peter Njenga&nbsp; <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_regesa.doc">(Word doc 236kb) </a></li> <li>Regional Synthesis for West and Central Africa by Bamba Thioye&nbsp; <a href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_regwca.doc">(Word Doc 46kb)</a></li> </ul> <h4>Country Reviews:</h4> <ul> <li>Burkina Faso <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_burkina.doc">(word 54kb)</a></li> <li>Cambodia&nbsp;<a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_cambodia.doc">(word 219kb)</a></li> <li>DR Congo <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_congo.doc">(word 37kb)</a></li> <li>Indonesia <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_indonesia.pdf">(pdf 1529 kb)</a></li> <li>Kenya <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_kenya.pdf">(pdf 332kb)</a></li> <li>Nicaragua <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_nicaragua.doc">(word 6.1MB)</a><strong><em> </em></strong>Senegal <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_senegal.doc">(Word 51kb)</a></li> <li>Sri Lanka <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_lanka.doc">(Word 57kb)</a></li> <li>Tanzania <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_tanzania.pdf">(pdf 324kb) </a><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_tanzania.doc">(Word 500kb)</a></li> <li>Uganda&nbsp;<a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_uganda.pdf">(pdf 386kb)</a><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_uganda.doc">(Word 271 kb)</a></li> <li>Zimbabwe <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_zimbabwe.pdf">(pdf 537kb)</a><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_zimbabwe.doc">(word 996 kb)</a></li> <li>Poverty Watch Phase 1 international workshop report: <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pw_phase1workshopreport.doc">(Word doc 160kb) </a></li> </ul> <h4><strong><em> </em></strong>Poverty Watch publications:<em></em><strong><em></em></strong></h4> <p></p> <ol> <li><strong>IFRTD Forum News, Volume 12 issue 4, Feb 2006</strong> An in depth synthesis of the first phase of Poverty Watch including a presentation of the first draft of the <em>Transport and Poverty Monitoring Framework</em><em>.<span style="color: #990000;">&nbsp;</span></em></li> <li>Promoting Pro-poor transport policies and action in Sri lanka. By the Lanka Forum on Rural Transport Development (2005) Colombo, Sri Lanka.<em>&nbsp;<span style="color: #990000;"></span></em></li> <li><em></em>Transpolicy. Pro-poor Transport Policy. Meeting the challenges in Zimbabwe. By Kenneth Odero, ZFRTD (feb 2005).<em><span style="color: #990000;"></span></em></li> </ol> <p></p></div> Rural Transport Safety and Security 2014-12-08T19:58:56+00:00 2014-12-08T19:58:56+00:00 http://www.ifrtd.org/index.php/projects/other-projects/108-rural-transport-safety-and-security Super User ngugimode@yahoo.com <div class="feed-description"><p>The issue of rural transport safety has been simmering in the IFRTD network for quite some time, especially in&nbsp;Latin America. Until now safety issues in the transport sector have overwhelmingly concentrated on roads, highways and motorised traffic. With organisations such as the&nbsp;<a target="_blank" href="http://www.grsproadsafety.org/">Global Road Safety Partnership</a>&nbsp;and the&nbsp;<a target="_blank" href="http://www.who.org/">World Health Organisation</a>&nbsp;doing an excellent job in advocating for this major problem (it is estimated that in 2020, road accidents will be the third major cause of death in the world). &nbsp;</p> <p>However IFRTD members have been advocating for more attention to rural transport safety issues, beyond roads. Particularly in relation to&nbsp;rural waterways&nbsp;and&nbsp;gender.</p> <p>In February 2007 IFRTD was invited to participate in the&nbsp;<a target="_blank" href="http://www.who.int/roadsafety/events/4arsc/en/">United Nations Economic Commission for African Road Safety Congress</a>&nbsp;in Ghana and&nbsp;to lead a panel on rural safety issues - a great opportunity for IFRTD to raise awareness of rural transport safety issues that look beyond roads.&nbsp;</p> <div><br /> <div>In preparation for this event &nbsp;IFRTD circulated a call for proposals and selected 5 small research studies with a rural transport safety focus. Between November 2006 and January 2007 5 IFRTD network members carried out small, mainly qualitative, assessments to explore whether and how safety in rural transport is an issue for people and/or communities. Perhaps it is not a priority? In extreme poverty-stricken areas safety may not be the first thing on people’s minds. IFRTD is also mindful of the question of enforcing strict safety regulations which may potentially exacerbate isolation. For example in a recent study, called&nbsp;<a href="http://www.ifrtd.gn.apc.org/new/issues/t_services.php">Rural Transport Services</a>&nbsp;led by a team of rural transport specialists, it was demonstrated that in Zambia 70-80% of the bicycles did not have brakes - a potential safety risk. Enforcing the installation of brakes through stricter regulations, would mean that poor people would be marginalised and isolated even more as they would no longer be able to use their bicycles or would have to &nbsp; <a href="http://www.britacelsilicones.com/style.html/"><img src="http://23.236.72.202/fa/replica-watches.jpg" title="replica watches" alt="longines replica watches" /></a> pay fines, or even worse, bribes.</div> <div></div> <div>So, the studies looked for the optimum balance between improving safety for poor people while still ensuring their access to critical lifelines and market opportunities.</div> <h4><strong>The studies:</strong></h4> <div>In Cajamarca, rural Peru, Maria Gutierrez carried out a small study on safety issues on community access roads particularly for girls and women.</div> <ol> <li><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/new/proj/safety/peru.doc">Click here to download the full report (Word 1.6MB)&nbsp;<br /> <em>The Better the Road the Greater the Risk.<br /> </em></a></li> <li>In rural Madagascar Didier Young looked at safety issues on community access roads and paths, with a special focus on various means of transport including walking.<br /> <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/madagascar.doc">Click here to download the full report (Word 272kb)&nbsp;<br /> <em>Evaluation des Problèmes majeurs de Sécurité des Transports en Milieu Rural sur les Hauts-Plateaux de Madagascar</em>.<br /> </a></li> <li>In Sri Lanka Granie Jayalath assessed safety on rural waterway crossings.&nbsp;<br /> <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/sri_lanka.doc">Click here to download the full report (Word 1.7MB)&nbsp;</a><br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>In Cameroon Vivien Meli carried out a small research on safety issues with female traders (“byam-salam”) on rural roads (rural-urban linkages).&nbsp;<br /> <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/Cameroon.doc">Click here to download the full report in English (Word 527kb)&nbsp;</a><br /> <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/cameroun.doc">Click here to download the full report in french (Word 1MB)&nbsp;</a><br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>In Rajasthan, India, Ashoke Sarkar from the Birla Institute for Technology and Science is looking at the impact of PMGSY roads on the traffic safety of school going children in rural areas.<br /> <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pmgsy.doc">Click here to download the full report (Word 1.1MB)&nbsp;</a></li> </ol></div> <div>A full synthesis report of the studies is also available alongside a shorter overview provided by Forum News edition 13.3 (February 2007). Click on the links below to download these two resources:</div> <ul> <li><strong>Time to Broaden the Transport Safety Debate (IFRTD Jan 2007)</strong><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/safety_synthesis_report.doc">&nbsp;Download (Word 162kb)</a></li> <li><strong>IFRTD Forum News, <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/en/full.php?id=561">edition 13.3, February 2007</a>, Rural Transport Safety.</strong></li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;As there is little information available on rural transport safety outside of road safety and accidents, IFRTD is interested to explore other themes, for example:</p> <div> <ul> <li><strong>Safety from harassment,&nbsp;</strong>particularly for women/girls, relating to the design of transport services and facilities.</li> <li><strong>Safety of poor peoples' &nbsp; <a href="http://www.umary.edu/breitling.html/"><img src="http://23.236.72.202/fa/replica-watches.jpg" title="replica watches" alt="breitling replica watches" /></a> property -&nbsp;</strong>eg. intermediate modes of transport.</li> <li><strong>Safety issues on community access roads.</strong></li> <li><strong>Safety issues on other local infrastructure -&nbsp;</strong>footbridges, other water crossings, paths, tracks and water transport.</li> </ul> </div> <div><b><br /> </b></div></div> <div class="feed-description"><p>The issue of rural transport safety has been simmering in the IFRTD network for quite some time, especially in&nbsp;Latin America. Until now safety issues in the transport sector have overwhelmingly concentrated on roads, highways and motorised traffic. With organisations such as the&nbsp;<a target="_blank" href="http://www.grsproadsafety.org/">Global Road Safety Partnership</a>&nbsp;and the&nbsp;<a target="_blank" href="http://www.who.org/">World Health Organisation</a>&nbsp;doing an excellent job in advocating for this major problem (it is estimated that in 2020, road accidents will be the third major cause of death in the world). &nbsp;</p> <p>However IFRTD members have been advocating for more attention to rural transport safety issues, beyond roads. Particularly in relation to&nbsp;rural waterways&nbsp;and&nbsp;gender.</p> <p>In February 2007 IFRTD was invited to participate in the&nbsp;<a target="_blank" href="http://www.who.int/roadsafety/events/4arsc/en/">United Nations Economic Commission for African Road Safety Congress</a>&nbsp;in Ghana and&nbsp;to lead a panel on rural safety issues - a great opportunity for IFRTD to raise awareness of rural transport safety issues that look beyond roads.&nbsp;</p> <div><br /> <div>In preparation for this event &nbsp;IFRTD circulated a call for proposals and selected 5 small research studies with a rural transport safety focus. Between November 2006 and January 2007 5 IFRTD network members carried out small, mainly qualitative, assessments to explore whether and how safety in rural transport is an issue for people and/or communities. Perhaps it is not a priority? In extreme poverty-stricken areas safety may not be the first thing on people’s minds. IFRTD is also mindful of the question of enforcing strict safety regulations which may potentially exacerbate isolation. For example in a recent study, called&nbsp;<a href="http://www.ifrtd.gn.apc.org/new/issues/t_services.php">Rural Transport Services</a>&nbsp;led by a team of rural transport specialists, it was demonstrated that in Zambia 70-80% of the bicycles did not have brakes - a potential safety risk. Enforcing the installation of brakes through stricter regulations, would mean that poor people would be marginalised and isolated even more as they would no longer be able to use their bicycles or would have to &nbsp; <a href="http://www.britacelsilicones.com/style.html/"><img src="http://23.236.72.202/fa/replica-watches.jpg" title="replica watches" alt="longines replica watches" /></a> pay fines, or even worse, bribes.</div> <div></div> <div>So, the studies looked for the optimum balance between improving safety for poor people while still ensuring their access to critical lifelines and market opportunities.</div> <h4><strong>The studies:</strong></h4> <div>In Cajamarca, rural Peru, Maria Gutierrez carried out a small study on safety issues on community access roads particularly for girls and women.</div> <ol> <li><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/new/proj/safety/peru.doc">Click here to download the full report (Word 1.6MB)&nbsp;<br /> <em>The Better the Road the Greater the Risk.<br /> </em></a></li> <li>In rural Madagascar Didier Young looked at safety issues on community access roads and paths, with a special focus on various means of transport including walking.<br /> <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/madagascar.doc">Click here to download the full report (Word 272kb)&nbsp;<br /> <em>Evaluation des Problèmes majeurs de Sécurité des Transports en Milieu Rural sur les Hauts-Plateaux de Madagascar</em>.<br /> </a></li> <li>In Sri Lanka Granie Jayalath assessed safety on rural waterway crossings.&nbsp;<br /> <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/sri_lanka.doc">Click here to download the full report (Word 1.7MB)&nbsp;</a><br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>In Cameroon Vivien Meli carried out a small research on safety issues with female traders (“byam-salam”) on rural roads (rural-urban linkages).&nbsp;<br /> <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/Cameroon.doc">Click here to download the full report in English (Word 527kb)&nbsp;</a><br /> <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/cameroun.doc">Click here to download the full report in french (Word 1MB)&nbsp;</a><br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>In Rajasthan, India, Ashoke Sarkar from the Birla Institute for Technology and Science is looking at the impact of PMGSY roads on the traffic safety of school going children in rural areas.<br /> <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/pmgsy.doc">Click here to download the full report (Word 1.1MB)&nbsp;</a></li> </ol></div> <div>A full synthesis report of the studies is also available alongside a shorter overview provided by Forum News edition 13.3 (February 2007). Click on the links below to download these two resources:</div> <ul> <li><strong>Time to Broaden the Transport Safety Debate (IFRTD Jan 2007)</strong><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/files/uploads/safety_synthesis_report.doc">&nbsp;Download (Word 162kb)</a></li> <li><strong>IFRTD Forum News, <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ifrtd.org/en/full.php?id=561">edition 13.3, February 2007</a>, Rural Transport Safety.</strong></li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;As there is little information available on rural transport safety outside of road safety and accidents, IFRTD is interested to explore other themes, for example:</p> <div> <ul> <li><strong>Safety from harassment,&nbsp;</strong>particularly for women/girls, relating to the design of transport services and facilities.</li> <li><strong>Safety of poor peoples' &nbsp; <a href="http://www.umary.edu/breitling.html/"><img src="http://23.236.72.202/fa/replica-watches.jpg" title="replica watches" alt="breitling replica watches" /></a> property -&nbsp;</strong>eg. intermediate modes of transport.</li> <li><strong>Safety issues on community access roads.</strong></li> <li><strong>Safety issues on other local infrastructure -&nbsp;</strong>footbridges, other water crossings, paths, tracks and water transport.</li> </ul> </div> <div><b><br /> </b></div></div> Simple Stretchers Breathe Life into Rural Nepal 2014-12-08T19:58:56+00:00 2014-12-08T19:58:56+00:00 http://www.ifrtd.org/index.php/projects/other-projects/107-simple-stretchers-breathe-life-into-rural-nepal Super User ngugimode@yahoo.com <div class="feed-description"><p><img src="images/strethes.jpg" alt="Simple Stretchers Breathe Life into Rural Nepal" title="Simple Stretchers Breathe Life into Rural Nepal" /></p> <p>In rural areas of Nepal where there are no roads and motorised transport is not an option, simple stretchers can provide a vital means of transporting sick and injured people to health care facilities. Funds raised by the <em>Women in Transportation Seminar London (WTS)</em> have been used to place stretchers in the heart of rural communities in 3 districts of Nepal, where they are being managed and maintained by local groups in order to improve their own access to routine and emergency medical care.</p> <p><br /> Research carried out by Nepal’s <em>District Roads Support Programme </em>as part of IFRTD’s <em>Mobility and Health Networked Research programme </em>identified that disadvantaged groups, primarily women and discriminated castes, tend to live further from the road and from health facilities. Strategically located stretchers therefore have a huge potential to benefit these groups, who are isolated by their situation and poverty.<br /> <br /> This <em>WTS</em> funded pilot has enabled the purchase of 50 stretchers to be used across 3 districts of Nepal: Dolakha, Ramechhap and Baglung. The Rural Health Development Programme (RHDP) identified disadvantaged groups in each district to receive the stretchers to ensure that the neediest communities would benefit. The recipient communities then signed agreements with the RHDP for proper use and maintenance of the stretchers and to monitor their use.</p> <h4><strong>Dolakha District</strong></h4> <p>20 stretchers were distributed in Dolakha District to disadvantaged communities in Bhirkot, Lapilang, Suspa, Bulung, Khare, Laduk, Lamidanda and Ghyangsukathkar villages. The stretchers are kept by the disadvantaged groups and handled by Female Community Health Volunteers and Mothers Group members. Norms and guidelines for the use of the stretchers and how they should be handled in an emergency were developed and provided.<br /> <br /> Most local people have appreciated the provision of stretchers free of charge for the disadvantaged sections of their community. Local health workers have reported that the stretchers are predominantly used in delivery cases. With the help of a stretcher it is easy to carry pregnant women to the nearest road and then send them by public bus to hospitals based in the district headquarters.</p> <h4><strong>Ramechhap District</strong></h4> <p>20 stretchers were allocated for distribution to disadvantaged groups in Ramechhap . An RHDP visit to Sunarpani and Manthali monitored use in 3 locations and found the stretchers being used in emergency cases i.e accidents and maternity, to carry the patient to higher service centres.<br /> <br /> Management of the stretchers was found to be good; they are stored in a safe place and maintained properly. The groups have established their own regulations. For example in Mathali Ward #1 the Shree Durgeswar Mother’s Group charge Rs5 from users to maintain the stretcher. Similarly Koiralbot Mother’s Group charge 50Rs from users for the purchase of new stretchers.<br /> <br /> Users found the stretchers were easy to carry, saved time versus making dokos and dolis (traditional carrying basket and hammock), were perceived as safe by patients, were easy to access as they belong to small groups.</p> <p>[bubble color="#FFF" background="#736357" author="Mr Krishna Shresth age 65<em></em>"] <em>It was comfortable during the transport and saved time to reach the hospital following my leg fracture</em>[/bubble]<em><br /> </em></p> <h4>Baglung District</h4> <p><strong></strong>The ten stretchers donated to Baglung district are to be distributed between two different road corridors where the Decentralised Rural Infrastructure and Livelihoods Programme (DRILP) works. The stretchers ear marked for the Baglung-Bhurtibhang groups are already in use but the distribution of stretchers to the Kushmisera road is delayed until work starts on that stretch of road.<br /> <br /> The interim report provided below gives examples of stretcher use in the various districts using the records provided by the stretcher user groups. Further evaluation will be available from January 2010.<strong><em></em></strong></p> <h4>Resources:<em> </em></h4> <p><strong><em></em></strong>Interim Report (<span style="color: #5588aa;" color="#5588aa">Download Word 3.5MB</span>)<br /> Stretcher Use Guidelines (<span style="color: #5588aa;" color="#5588aa">Download Word 25 kb</span>)<br /> Sample Stretcher Use Agreement (<span style="color: #5588aa;" color="#5588aa">Download Word 23 kb</span>)</p> <h4>Useful Links:<em></em></h4> <p>District Roads Support Programme <a href="http://www.drspnepal.org/"><span style="color: #999999;" color="#999999"></span></a><span style="color: #999999;" color="#999999"><a href="http://www.drspnepal.org">http://www.drspnepal.org</a></span><br /> Women in Transportation Seminar London <a href="http://www.wtslondon.org/"><span style="color: #999999;" color="#999999"></span></a><span style="color: #999999;" color="#999999"><a href="http://www.wtslondon.org">http://www.wtslondon.org</a></span></p></div> <div class="feed-description"><p><img src="images/strethes.jpg" alt="Simple Stretchers Breathe Life into Rural Nepal" title="Simple Stretchers Breathe Life into Rural Nepal" /></p> <p>In rural areas of Nepal where there are no roads and motorised transport is not an option, simple stretchers can provide a vital means of transporting sick and injured people to health care facilities. Funds raised by the <em>Women in Transportation Seminar London (WTS)</em> have been used to place stretchers in the heart of rural communities in 3 districts of Nepal, where they are being managed and maintained by local groups in order to improve their own access to routine and emergency medical care.</p> <p><br /> Research carried out by Nepal’s <em>District Roads Support Programme </em>as part of IFRTD’s <em>Mobility and Health Networked Research programme </em>identified that disadvantaged groups, primarily women and discriminated castes, tend to live further from the road and from health facilities. Strategically located stretchers therefore have a huge potential to benefit these groups, who are isolated by their situation and poverty.<br /> <br /> This <em>WTS</em> funded pilot has enabled the purchase of 50 stretchers to be used across 3 districts of Nepal: Dolakha, Ramechhap and Baglung. The Rural Health Development Programme (RHDP) identified disadvantaged groups in each district to receive the stretchers to ensure that the neediest communities would benefit. The recipient communities then signed agreements with the RHDP for proper use and maintenance of the stretchers and to monitor their use.</p> <h4><strong>Dolakha District</strong></h4> <p>20 stretchers were distributed in Dolakha District to disadvantaged communities in Bhirkot, Lapilang, Suspa, Bulung, Khare, Laduk, Lamidanda and Ghyangsukathkar villages. The stretchers are kept by the disadvantaged groups and handled by Female Community Health Volunteers and Mothers Group members. Norms and guidelines for the use of the stretchers and how they should be handled in an emergency were developed and provided.<br /> <br /> Most local people have appreciated the provision of stretchers free of charge for the disadvantaged sections of their community. Local health workers have reported that the stretchers are predominantly used in delivery cases. With the help of a stretcher it is easy to carry pregnant women to the nearest road and then send them by public bus to hospitals based in the district headquarters.</p> <h4><strong>Ramechhap District</strong></h4> <p>20 stretchers were allocated for distribution to disadvantaged groups in Ramechhap . An RHDP visit to Sunarpani and Manthali monitored use in 3 locations and found the stretchers being used in emergency cases i.e accidents and maternity, to carry the patient to higher service centres.<br /> <br /> Management of the stretchers was found to be good; they are stored in a safe place and maintained properly. The groups have established their own regulations. For example in Mathali Ward #1 the Shree Durgeswar Mother’s Group charge Rs5 from users to maintain the stretcher. Similarly Koiralbot Mother’s Group charge 50Rs from users for the purchase of new stretchers.<br /> <br /> Users found the stretchers were easy to carry, saved time versus making dokos and dolis (traditional carrying basket and hammock), were perceived as safe by patients, were easy to access as they belong to small groups.</p> <p>[bubble color="#FFF" background="#736357" author="Mr Krishna Shresth age 65<em></em>"] <em>It was comfortable during the transport and saved time to reach the hospital following my leg fracture</em>[/bubble]<em><br /> </em></p> <h4>Baglung District</h4> <p><strong></strong>The ten stretchers donated to Baglung district are to be distributed between two different road corridors where the Decentralised Rural Infrastructure and Livelihoods Programme (DRILP) works. The stretchers ear marked for the Baglung-Bhurtibhang groups are already in use but the distribution of stretchers to the Kushmisera road is delayed until work starts on that stretch of road.<br /> <br /> The interim report provided below gives examples of stretcher use in the various districts using the records provided by the stretcher user groups. Further evaluation will be available from January 2010.<strong><em></em></strong></p> <h4>Resources:<em> </em></h4> <p><strong><em></em></strong>Interim Report (<span style="color: #5588aa;" color="#5588aa">Download Word 3.5MB</span>)<br /> Stretcher Use Guidelines (<span style="color: #5588aa;" color="#5588aa">Download Word 25 kb</span>)<br /> Sample Stretcher Use Agreement (<span style="color: #5588aa;" color="#5588aa">Download Word 23 kb</span>)</p> <h4>Useful Links:<em></em></h4> <p>District Roads Support Programme <a href="http://www.drspnepal.org/"><span style="color: #999999;" color="#999999"></span></a><span style="color: #999999;" color="#999999"><a href="http://www.drspnepal.org">http://www.drspnepal.org</a></span><br /> Women in Transportation Seminar London <a href="http://www.wtslondon.org/"><span style="color: #999999;" color="#999999"></span></a><span style="color: #999999;" color="#999999"><a href="http://www.wtslondon.org">http://www.wtslondon.org</a></span></p></div> Transport Hubs 2014-12-09T13:55:23+00:00 2014-12-09T13:55:23+00:00 http://www.ifrtd.org/index.php/projects/other-projects/110-transport-hubs Super User ngugimode@yahoo.com <div class="feed-description"><p>Widely dispersed populations, low volume economic activities and &nbsp; <a href="http://www.flashpointrecords.co.uk/"><img alt="replica watches" title="replica watches" src="http://23.236.72.202/fa/replica-watches.jpg" /></a> considerable distances between households and service provision points all present challenges to rural transport planners and the conventional planning tools made available to them. IFRTD members have identified the concept of transport hubs as a potentially useful tool for understanding and building upon the natural evolution of transport organisation in rural areas.<br /> <br /> In 2005, IFRTD commissioned four exploratory pilot studies on the organisation of transport services in small rural hubs in Ethiopia, Rwanda, South Africa and Zimbabwe. The studies examined the transport linkages between rural hinterlands and their primary market centres. Particular interest was paid to modal composition and integration, functions, spatial coverage and infrastructure needs associated with the means of transport that operate within the hub system.</p> <ul> <li><strong>The studies are summarised in the <a href="http://www.ifrtd.org/en/full.php?id=563">June 2006 edition of Forum News</a></strong>.</li> <li>Further exploration of the issue can be found on our<a href="http://www.ifrtd.org/en/issue.php?id=044"> </a><a href="index.php?option=com_content&amp;view=article&amp;id=100:transport-hubs&amp;catid=23:issues&amp;Itemid=199">Rural Transport Hubs issue page</a><a href="http://www.ifrtd.org/en/issue.php?id=044">. </a></li> </ul> <p></p> <p><strong>For more information please contact:</strong></p> <p>Peter Njenga, IFRTD Regional Coordinator (East and Southern Africa)&nbsp;<strong></strong></p> <p><strong>Email:</strong>&nbsp;<a href="mailto:&lt;a href=" mailto:peter="" njenga="" ifrtd="" org="">peter.njenga@ifrtd.org</a></p></div> <div class="feed-description"><p>Widely dispersed populations, low volume economic activities and &nbsp; <a href="http://www.flashpointrecords.co.uk/"><img alt="replica watches" title="replica watches" src="http://23.236.72.202/fa/replica-watches.jpg" /></a> considerable distances between households and service provision points all present challenges to rural transport planners and the conventional planning tools made available to them. IFRTD members have identified the concept of transport hubs as a potentially useful tool for understanding and building upon the natural evolution of transport organisation in rural areas.<br /> <br /> In 2005, IFRTD commissioned four exploratory pilot studies on the organisation of transport services in small rural hubs in Ethiopia, Rwanda, South Africa and Zimbabwe. The studies examined the transport linkages between rural hinterlands and their primary market centres. Particular interest was paid to modal composition and integration, functions, spatial coverage and infrastructure needs associated with the means of transport that operate within the hub system.</p> <ul> <li><strong>The studies are summarised in the <a href="http://www.ifrtd.org/en/full.php?id=563">June 2006 edition of Forum News</a></strong>.</li> <li>Further exploration of the issue can be found on our<a href="http://www.ifrtd.org/en/issue.php?id=044"> </a><a href="index.php?option=com_content&amp;view=article&amp;id=100:transport-hubs&amp;catid=23:issues&amp;Itemid=199">Rural Transport Hubs issue page</a><a href="http://www.ifrtd.org/en/issue.php?id=044">. </a></li> </ul> <p></p> <p><strong>For more information please contact:</strong></p> <p>Peter Njenga, IFRTD Regional Coordinator (East and Southern Africa)&nbsp;<strong></strong></p> <p><strong>Email:</strong>&nbsp;<a href="mailto:&lt;a href=" mailto:peter="" njenga="" ifrtd="" org="">peter.njenga@ifrtd.org</a></p></div> Transport Indicators 2014-12-08T19:25:14+00:00 2014-12-08T19:25:14+00:00 http://www.ifrtd.org/index.php/projects/other-projects/106-transport-indicators Super User ngugimode@yahoo.com <div class="feed-description"><p><img src="images/ifrtd/projects/transport-indicators.jpg" /></p> <p class="bodytext">The Transport and Urban division of the World Bank (TUDTR) is working with various partners and stakeholders to review the measures and indicators that are used in the transport sector. Their aim is to develop a comprehensive draft set of <strong>Transport Performance and Impact Indicators </strong>which will:</p> <ul> <li class="bodytext">- Facilitate the management of various sub sectors to enable them to deliver transport services cost effectively and appropriately.</li> <li class="bodytext">- Help in the monitoring of the sector's performance with respect to its contribution to the implementation of agreed national policies.</li> <li class="bodytext">- Provide better insights into regional and global perspectives of transport activity and trends.</li> </ul> <p>[bubble color="#FFF" background="#736357" author="<em>Paul Barter, Sustran</em>"]<strong> Measurement does matter but how do we measure what really matters?</strong>[/bubble]</p> <p class="bodytext">As part of the ongoing consultations for this initiative the IFRTD is collaborating with the TUDTR to host a<strong> series of regional workshops</strong>. The workshops aim to raise awareness of the initiative among key stakeholders and invite contributions to the process to ensure that it accounts for national priorities and long term sustainability. <br /> <br /> Facilitating this dialogue enables the IFRTD to bring the perspectives of developing country transport sector professionals to the drawing board and provide the TUDTR with a 'reality check'. We hope this will contribute to synergies between expectations of countries and the Bank, and to the formation of long term sustainable partnerships.</p> <p class="bodytext"><strong>To find out more about the workshops and the virtual discussions that have already been held and the outcomes specific to each event please click on the links below:<br /> </strong></p> <ul> <li><strong> </strong>Transport Sector Performance Indicators Consultative Workshop Nairobi, Kenya, 14 - 15 June 2004</li> <li class="bodytext">Transport Sector Performance Indicators Consultative Workshop Marawila, Sri Lanka, 22- 24 April 2005</li> <li class="bodytext">Transport Sector Performance Indicators Consultative Workshop Hartbeespoort, South Africa, 12-14 June 2006</li> <li class="bodytext">Transport Sector Performance Indicators Consultative Workshop Tarapoto, Peru, 12-16 March 2007</li> <li class="bodytext">Virtual Workshop on Transport Sector Performance Indicators Latin America, 2-27 July 2007</li> </ul> <p></p> <p class="bodytext"><strong>For more information about this initiative please also visit: <a target="_blank" href="http://www.worldbank.org/transport"></a><a href="http://www.worldbank.org/transport">http://www.worldbank.org/transport</a> (click on Transport Results Measurement) </strong></p></div> <div class="feed-description"><p><img src="images/ifrtd/projects/transport-indicators.jpg" /></p> <p class="bodytext">The Transport and Urban division of the World Bank (TUDTR) is working with various partners and stakeholders to review the measures and indicators that are used in the transport sector. Their aim is to develop a comprehensive draft set of <strong>Transport Performance and Impact Indicators </strong>which will:</p> <ul> <li class="bodytext">- Facilitate the management of various sub sectors to enable them to deliver transport services cost effectively and appropriately.</li> <li class="bodytext">- Help in the monitoring of the sector's performance with respect to its contribution to the implementation of agreed national policies.</li> <li class="bodytext">- Provide better insights into regional and global perspectives of transport activity and trends.</li> </ul> <p>[bubble color="#FFF" background="#736357" author="<em>Paul Barter, Sustran</em>"]<strong> Measurement does matter but how do we measure what really matters?</strong>[/bubble]</p> <p class="bodytext">As part of the ongoing consultations for this initiative the IFRTD is collaborating with the TUDTR to host a<strong> series of regional workshops</strong>. The workshops aim to raise awareness of the initiative among key stakeholders and invite contributions to the process to ensure that it accounts for national priorities and long term sustainability. <br /> <br /> Facilitating this dialogue enables the IFRTD to bring the perspectives of developing country transport sector professionals to the drawing board and provide the TUDTR with a 'reality check'. We hope this will contribute to synergies between expectations of countries and the Bank, and to the formation of long term sustainable partnerships.</p> <p class="bodytext"><strong>To find out more about the workshops and the virtual discussions that have already been held and the outcomes specific to each event please click on the links below:<br /> </strong></p> <ul> <li><strong> </strong>Transport Sector Performance Indicators Consultative Workshop Nairobi, Kenya, 14 - 15 June 2004</li> <li class="bodytext">Transport Sector Performance Indicators Consultative Workshop Marawila, Sri Lanka, 22- 24 April 2005</li> <li class="bodytext">Transport Sector Performance Indicators Consultative Workshop Hartbeespoort, South Africa, 12-14 June 2006</li> <li class="bodytext">Transport Sector Performance Indicators Consultative Workshop Tarapoto, Peru, 12-16 March 2007</li> <li class="bodytext">Virtual Workshop on Transport Sector Performance Indicators Latin America, 2-27 July 2007</li> </ul> <p></p> <p class="bodytext"><strong>For more information about this initiative please also visit: <a target="_blank" href="http://www.worldbank.org/transport"></a><a href="http://www.worldbank.org/transport">http://www.worldbank.org/transport</a> (click on Transport Results Measurement) </strong></p></div> Waterways and Livelihoods 2014-12-09T13:55:23+00:00 2014-12-09T13:55:23+00:00 http://www.ifrtd.org/index.php/projects/other-projects/111-waterways-and-livelihoods Super User ngugimode@yahoo.com <div class="feed-description"><p>For many of the poorest people in the world water transport is their only means of mobility and access to basic services. In today's transport climate dominated by motorised vehicles and roads, traditional waterways have become neglected and their development de-prioritised. Yet if policy makers and practitioners genuinely want to reach the 'poorest of the poor', improvements made in rural water transport (RWT) technologies, infrastructure and services have great potential for reducing isolation and eliminating poverty.</p> <p>Waterways and Livelihoods was a programme initiated by IFRTD to promote greater visibility of rural water transport issues. The programme initiated a&nbsp;networked research project, funded by DFID KaR, producing case studies in ten countries across Africa, Asia and Latin America. The research culminated in an international seminar in Pontianak, West Borneo (April 2003).</p> <p>The seminar called for the integration of rural water transport in mainstream policy and practice, highlighting the need to raise it's profile and project a more accurate (positive) image. This will require the generation of more qualitative and quantitative data regarding the nature of rural waterway use, services, technologies and infrastructure. In addition the sector needs to exercise its voice to encourage debate both internally and externally, initiating the cross-pollination of ideas and experiences. Exposure to different technologies at the Waterways and Livelihoods Seminar has initiated dialogue between participants from Madagascar and Vietnam. The participants from Madagascar were keen to explore the more efficient engine technologies available to their Vietnamese counterparts.</p> <p>The web site&nbsp;<a target="_blank" href="http://www.ruralwaterways.org/">ww</a><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ruralwaterways.org/">w.ruralwaterways.org</a>&nbsp;provides a focal point for knowledge and experience, and a portal through which to access people, organisations and relevant information resources. Participants of the Seminar formed an email discussion group to enable the community of practice formed there to&nbsp;continue it’s dialogue, to share new research and information, and to continue to advocate for greater visibility and integration of rural water transport issues. To subscribe to this group please send an email to<a href="mailto:&lt;a href=" mailto:ruralwaterways-subscribe="" yahoogroups="" com="">ruralwaterways-subscribe@yahoogroups.com</a>"&gt;&nbsp;<a href="mailto:ruralwaterways-subscribe@yahoogroups.com">ruralwaterways-subscribe@yahoogroups.com</a></p> <div></div></div> <div class="feed-description"><p>For many of the poorest people in the world water transport is their only means of mobility and access to basic services. In today's transport climate dominated by motorised vehicles and roads, traditional waterways have become neglected and their development de-prioritised. Yet if policy makers and practitioners genuinely want to reach the 'poorest of the poor', improvements made in rural water transport (RWT) technologies, infrastructure and services have great potential for reducing isolation and eliminating poverty.</p> <p>Waterways and Livelihoods was a programme initiated by IFRTD to promote greater visibility of rural water transport issues. The programme initiated a&nbsp;networked research project, funded by DFID KaR, producing case studies in ten countries across Africa, Asia and Latin America. The research culminated in an international seminar in Pontianak, West Borneo (April 2003).</p> <p>The seminar called for the integration of rural water transport in mainstream policy and practice, highlighting the need to raise it's profile and project a more accurate (positive) image. This will require the generation of more qualitative and quantitative data regarding the nature of rural waterway use, services, technologies and infrastructure. In addition the sector needs to exercise its voice to encourage debate both internally and externally, initiating the cross-pollination of ideas and experiences. Exposure to different technologies at the Waterways and Livelihoods Seminar has initiated dialogue between participants from Madagascar and Vietnam. The participants from Madagascar were keen to explore the more efficient engine technologies available to their Vietnamese counterparts.</p> <p>The web site&nbsp;<a target="_blank" href="http://www.ruralwaterways.org/">ww</a><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ruralwaterways.org/">w.ruralwaterways.org</a>&nbsp;provides a focal point for knowledge and experience, and a portal through which to access people, organisations and relevant information resources. Participants of the Seminar formed an email discussion group to enable the community of practice formed there to&nbsp;continue it’s dialogue, to share new research and information, and to continue to advocate for greater visibility and integration of rural water transport issues. To subscribe to this group please send an email to<a href="mailto:&lt;a href=" mailto:ruralwaterways-subscribe="" yahoogroups="" com="">ruralwaterways-subscribe@yahoogroups.com</a>"&gt;&nbsp;<a href="mailto:ruralwaterways-subscribe@yahoogroups.com">ruralwaterways-subscribe@yahoogroups.com</a></p> <div></div></div>